Frybread and Film

The Cree word for grandmother is kôkom and last Sunday’s full moon was Mikisewipisim, the Eagle Moon, when the eagles return to this territory.

These are things I’ve learned living up here, and I’m eager to know more, so I’m excited to attend what I can of the first annual Storytellers Film Festival, an event spearheaded by an emergency room doctor who splits his time between The Pas and Toronto.

The screenings will sadly not take place at the Lido, the 1930’s, atmospheric theatre that’s been closed since the fall, but instead, at the Wescana Inn, which has hosted so many unique events in our community.

The festival launches tonight with the world premiere of Finding Sgt. Partridge, a film documenting a British woman’s search for her Cree grandfather, which ultimately led her to The Pas.

On Saturday afternoon, during the event Itenihtamiwin, several shorts will be followed by conversation with local elders and film directors.

Then enjoy a snack of stew and bannock prepared by Cree high-school students while watching the feature film More Than Fry Bread.

If you’re vicariously visiting North of 53, take a look at this trailer sampler of some of the films that will be showing. And if you’re local, head out to support this gathering of stories significant to aboriginal and northern people (download the full schedule here).

Nikamowin:

Reel Injun:

The Lesser Blessed:

Wakening:

Rhymes for Young Ghouls:


More than Fry Bread
:

Boy:

, , , ,

One Response to Frybread and Film

  1. Laura Carter March 20, 2014 at 12:23 pm #

    Sounds so good. Wish I could be there. I’ll take a peek at the previews.
    There is always so much to learn about where we’re at, wherever we call home.

    The other day friend Shimera was contacting the local Welcome Wagon about including information about our local art club in their package to new folks in town. She said we met at OMAH. ( Orillia Museum of Art and History). The woman asked what and where that was and when she found out she said she’d never heard of it although she had lived in Orillia her whole life. It’s one of our most historic and significant buildings. We can so easily miss a lot of what our community has to offer. It’s our choice.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes

%d bloggers like this: